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Buoycott: Ukrainian sailor sinks Russian oligarch’s superyacht

March 2, 2022

Buoycott: Ukrainian sailor sinks Russian oligarch’s superyacht

Australian businesses, including Dan Murphy’s and BWS, have stripped their shelves of Russian-made vodka amid calls for boycotts, but one Ukrainian man has taken it further.

Australian businesses, including Dan Murphy’s and BWS, have stripped their shelves of Russian-made vodka amid calls for boycotts, but one Ukrainian man has taken it further.

Following pressure from the Australian Federation of Ukrainian Organisations, several businesses around Australia have agreed to cease the sale of Russian goods as consumers and activists look to financially penalise the country for its invasion of Ukraine.

This push from consumer groups comes amid widespread sanctions that are threatening to derail Russia’s economy, with Prime Minister Scott Morrison even floating the possibility of stopping all trade with the renegade nation.

Similar boycotts are popping up around the world as consumers look to put their money where their mouths are and end any indirect financial support for Russia.

Ukrainian sailor Taras Ostapchuk, however, chose a more direct way to hit Russian finances. Or specifically, to hit the finances of his boss Alexander Mijeev, the CEO of Russian weapons business Rosoboronexport.

After seeing footage of rockets that he believed had been supplied by Rosoboronexport striking indiscriminate targets across Ukraine, 55-year-old Mr Ostapchuk attempted to sink Mr Mijeev’s $10 million superyacht, Lady Anastasia.

Mr Ostapchuk – who has been a mechanic aboard the Lady Anastasia for the past decade – allegedly opened a large valve in the ship’s engine room in an attempt to flood it.

He reportedly told the remaining crew to abandon ship but those aboard instead tried to keep Lady Anastasia afloat, resulting in a partial sinking of the superyacht.

“The owner of this yacht is a criminal who makes his living selling arms that are now being used to kill Ukrainians,” Mr Ostapchuk told police while being arrested.

Mr Ostapchuk reportedly later told a judge that he had no regrets and would do it again.

Sources


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