Tie-breaker: Spanish PM lets loose with ideas to fix energy crisis

As Australia grapples with its worst-ever energy crisis, white-collar workers might be wise to take a leaf out of Spain’s book, courtesy of one seemingly off-the-cuff idea from its enterprising leader.

As Australia grapples with its worst-ever energy crisis, white-collar workers might be wise to take a leaf out of Spain’s book, courtesy of one seemingly off-the-cuff idea from its enterprising leader.

Spanish PM Pedro Sanchez has already introduced several urgent measures to save energy, in light of uncertainty around Russian gas supplies, including limiting air conditioning in public buildings, transport, hotels, stores and shopping centres to 27C in summer and 19C in winter.

The measures – in place until November 2023 and with fines expected for non-conformists – have raised more than a few eyebrows, but it’s another of Mr Sanchez’s solutions that has grabbed people by the scruff of the neck.

With energy costs rising due to the Russia-Ukraine conflict, and spiralling air conditioning costs due to scorching temperatures across the country, Mr Sanchez has asked government officials and those in the private sector to save energy by giving up wearing neckties.

“I’d like you to note that I am not wearing a tie,” he told a recent news conference, dressed in an open-necked white shirt and blue jacket.

“If it’s not necessary, don’t use a tie. That means that we can all make savings from an energy point of view.”

The PM said the plan was designed to cut utility bills and to reduce energy dependency on “the aggressor, (Russian President Vladimir) Putin”.

Actually, it’s a no-brainer

Energy conservation isn’t the only reason to consider ditching the necktie – studies have shown the continuous wearing of a tie during the workday reduces blood flow to the brain.

Doctors at the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Germany – who monitored 30 people with an average age of 24.6 years and in perfect health – found the blood flow that reached the brain decreased as a result of the pressure exerted by a tie on the blood vessels of the neck.

The decrease was 7.5% in the volunteers with the necktie tightened and 5.7% in those who wore it loosened – levels that can be a risk factor in smokers, the elderly and people with high blood pressure.

Sources:

 

This Week’s News

News

8 May 2024

BHP Xplor winner coming to the ASX

News

16 April 2024

Gold at record highs – so why aren’t gold stocks?

News

22 November 2023

Rare Earths Industry Review: Part 2

General Advice Warning

Any advice provided by Reach Markets including on its website and by its representatives is general advice only and does not consider your objectives, financial situation or needs, and you should consider whether it is appropriate for you. This might mean that you need to seek personal advice from a representative authorised to provide personal advice. If you are thinking about acquiring a financial product, you should consider our Financial Services Guide (FSG)

including the Privacy Statement and any relevant Product Disclosure Statement or Prospectus (if one is available) to understand the features, risks and returns associated with the investment.

Please click here to read our full warning.